Current Mortgage Rates, November 2, 2020 | Rates go up

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Multiple closely watched mortgage rates rose today. The average rates on 30-year fixed and 15-year fixed mortgages both increased. Meanwhile, the average rate on 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages decreased.

Current average mortgage interest rates
Loan type Interest rate A week ago Change
30-year fixed rate 3.06% 3.03% +0.03
15-year fixed rate 2.63% 2.58% -0.05
30-year fixed jumbo rate 3.04% 3.10% -0.06
30-year fixed refinance rate 3.12% 3.23% -0.11

Updated on November 2, 2020.

Rates for mortgages are in a constant state of flux, but they remain low by historical standards. If you’re in the market for a mortgage, it may make sense to go ahead and lock if you see a rate you like. Just don’t do so without shopping around first.

Find the right mortgage rate for your specific criteria.

30-year mortgages

The average rate for the benchmark 30-year fixed mortgage is 3.06 percent, up 3 basis points over the last seven days. A month ago, the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was lower, at 3.05 percent.

At the current average rate, you’ll pay a combined $424.85 per month in principal and interest for every $100,000 you borrow. That’s $1.63 higher compared with last week.

You can use Bankrate’s mortgage calculator to estimate your monthly payments and see the effect of adding extra payments. It will also help you computehow much interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan.

15-year fixed mortgages

The average 15-year fixed-mortgage rate is 2.63 percent, up 5 basis points from a week ago.

Monthly payments on a 15-year fixed mortgage at that rate will cost around $673 per $100,000 borrowed. That’s obviously much higher than the monthly payment would be on a 30-year mortgage at that rate, but it comes with some big advantages: You’ll come out several thousand dollars ahead over the life of the loan in total interest paid and build equity much more quickly.

5/1 ARMs

The average rate on a 5/1 adjustable rate mortgageis 3.04 percent, down 3 basis points over the last week.

These types of loans are best for those who expect to refinance or sell before the first or second adjustment. Rates could be materially higher when the loan first adjusts, and thereafter.

Monthly payments on a 5/1 ARM at 3.04 percent would cost about $424 for each $100,000 borrowed over the initial five years, but could ratchet higher by hundreds of dollars afterward, depending on the loan’s terms.

Where rates are headed

To see where Bankrate’s panel of experts expect rates to go from here, check out our mortgage interest rates forecast.

Want to see where rates are currently? Lenders nationwide respond to Bankrate.com’s weekday mortgage rates survey to bring you the most current rates available. Here you can see the latest marketplace average rates for a wide variety of purchase loans:

Lock your mortgage rate now or wait?

A rate lock guarantees your interest rate for a specified period of time. It’s common for lenders to offer 30-day rate locks for a fee or to include the price of the rate lock into your loan. Some mortgage lenders will lock rates for longer periods of time, sometimes for more than 60 days, but those locks can be costly. In today’s unstable market, some lenders will lock an interest rate for only two weeks because they don’t want to take on unnecessary risk.

The benefit of a rate lock is that if interest rates rise, you’re locked into the guaranteed rate. You may be able to find a lender that offers a floating rate lock. A floating rate lock lets you get a lower rate if interest rates decline before closing your loan. It could be worth the cost in a declining rate environment. Because mortgage rates are not predictable, there’s no guarantee that rates will stay where they are from week to week or even day to day. So, if you can lock in a low rate, then you should do so rather than gamble on interest rates falling even lower.

Keep in mind that during the pandemic, all aspects of real estate and mortgage closings are taking much longer than usual. Expect the closing on a new mortgage to take at least 60 days, and expect refinancing to take at least a month.

Why do mortgage rates move up and down?

A number of economic factors influence mortgage rates. Among them are inflation and unemployment. Higher inflation typically leads to higher mortgage rates. The opposite is also true; when inflation is low, mortgage rates typically are as well. As inflation increases, the dollar loses value. That drives investors away from mortgage-backed securities (MBS), which causes the prices to decrease and yields to increase. When yields move higher, rates become more expensive for borrowers.

A strong economy usually means more people buying homes, which drives demand for mortgages. This increased demand can push rates higher. The opposite is also true; less demand can trigger a drop in rates.

Are mortgage rates rising or falling?

Mortgage rates have hovered around all-time lows in recent months, but where they go from here is nearly impossible to predict. The direction of rates depends largely on the direction of the economy. It also depends on how well the coronavirus pandemic is contained. The general consensus: If the economy continues to bounce back, and if drugmakers are successful in developing a vaccine, rates will rise. On the other hand, if the economy struggles because of coronavirus-related setbacks, mortgage rates will remain at record lows or fall even further.

Is now a good time to buy a house?

There’s never a straightforward answer to this question. It always depends. Do you have a reliable income, a good credit score and money saved for a down payment and repairs? If you can answer all of those questions affirmatively, you’re ready to buy.

However, the pandemic has exacerbated a shortage of homes, leading to bidding wars and rising prices. Those trends mean it can be a frustrating market for buyers.

To learn more about the different rate averages Bankrate publishes, see “Bankrate’s Rate Averages Methodology.”

Read more:
Refinance rates today
Today’s 30-year mortgage rates
Searching for the right lender?
Optimum First Mortgage Review
Cardinal Financial Mortgage Review
Citi Bank Mortgage Review
CFBank Mortgage Review

Methodology: The rates you see above are Bankrate.com Site Averages. These calculations are run after the close of the previous business day and include rates and/or yields we have collected that day for a specific banking product. Bankrate.com site averages tend to be volatile — they help consumers see the movement of rates day to day. The institutions included in the “Bankrate.com Site Average” tables will be different from one day to the next, depending on which institutions’ rates we gather on a particular day for presentation on the site.

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